Self-Care for Healthcare Professionals

Self-Care for Healthcare Professionals: Connection between individual well-being and the ability to care for others

Burnout is a common syndrome seen in healthcare workers, particularly physicians who are exposed to a high level of stress at work; it includes emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and low personal accomplishment. Burnout among physicians has garnered significant attention because of the negative impact it renders on patient care and medical personnel.

Contact us for more information .

Special offer for ASEAN based healthcare facilities:

We now offer workshops for Healthcare facilities as presented to an international group of Physicians at the Annual Congress of Medicine hosted in Bangkok 2018

For a customized proposal and special arrangements please contact: Judith@coulson-holding.com

Workshop length

90 -120 min.

Language

English

Group size

up to 25 participants

Price

350 USD per hour

excluding: travel, printing, translation

Are you a Change Agent?

PHYSICIAN WELLNESS: CHANGING THE CULTURE

“We need to protect the workforce that protects our patients.”

Tim Brigham, MDiv, PhD, Senior Vice President, Education, ACGME

Impaired physicians and healthcare professionals can have a direct impact on patient health care and safety. While some problems of alcoholism and substance abuse among physicians have been addressed, basic concepts like healthy food and lifestyle choices, as well as mental health issues are still widely ignored. While patient safety is paramount, the medical profession might be more successful in achieving the required standards by fostering a culture committed to self-care, health and wellness. Burnout is a common syndrome seen in healthcare workers, particularly physicians and emergency staff, who are exposed to a high level of stress at work. A survey of the topic, taken in 2011, found that close to half of doctors, 45% experienced at least one component of burnout, meaning they are emotionally exhausted, often treat patients as objects, or have lost their sense of purpose. Three years later, the survey numbers got worse. In 2014, burned-out doctors made up 54% of the profession. The time has come for academic medicine to lead by example for the population and to practice what they preach. To do this, we must first develop a shared understanding of physician wellness followed by interventional strategies that lead to a cultural change, including a more positive educational environment for residents and faculty. We need to raise the awareness of self-care and its relation to health, well-being, and burnouts. There is a need to create an environment that allows the admitting of burnout symptoms, enable the development of preventive strategies, and create a more positive, strength-based approach to health care professional’s own health and well-being.

1. Bridgeman, P. J., Bridgeman, M. B., & Barone, J. (2018). Burnout syndrome among healthcare professionals.

3. Hull, S. K., DiLalla, L. F., & Dorsey, J. K. (2008). Prevalence of Health-Related Behaviors among Physicians and Medical Trainees.

2. Bria, M., Băaban, A., & Dumitraşcu, D. L. (2012). SYSTEMATIC REVIEW OF BURNOUT RISK FACTORS AMONG EUROPEAN HEALTHCARE PROFESSIONALS.

4. Albuquerque, J., & Deshauer, D. (2014). Physician health: Beyond work–life balance.